Yersinia

  • pathogenic species comprise Y. enterocolitica, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y. pestis
  • pathogenicity typically associated with the presence of a virulence plasmid
  • preference for colder waters
  • can grow at very low temperatures (4°C and lower) in oligotrophic environments
  • susceptible to disinfectants, but increased resistance when ingested by protozoa

For more information, visit the Waterborne Pathogens Website

Images

This image depicts a Petri dish containing a sheep’s blood agar (SBA) medium, which had been inoculated with Gram-negative Yersinia pestis bacteria.

Y. pestis is the pathogen responsible for causing human plague. This was the appearance of the colonial growth after 96 hours of incubation at 25º C.

Please consider thatYersinia pestis is not a waterborne pathogen. However, it has the same morphology as Y. entercolitica and other waterborne Yersinia spp.

                                                Yersinia_Photo 1                                 

Source: http://phil.cdc.gov/phil/home.asp
Photo ID: 11774
Content provider(s): Centers for Disease Control/ Megan Mathias and J. Todd Parker

Optical microscopy of mice spleen infected with Yersinia spp. The staining was done using Methylene Blue according to Loeffer

                                                  Yersinia_Photo 2                                            

Credit: The picture was kindly provided by Dra. Alzira Almeida, Centro de Pesquisas Aggeu Magalhães – Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (CpqAm-Fiocruz)

Optical microscopy of blood infected with Yersinia spp.

                                                  Yersinia_Photo 3                                                                                     

Credit: The picture was kindly provided by Dra. Alzira Almeida, Centro de Pesquisas Aggeu Magalhães – Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (CpqAm-Fiocruz)

Scanning electron micrograph depicting a mass of Yersinia pestis bacteria (the cause of bubonic plague) in the foregut of the flea vector.

Please consider thatYersinia pestis is not a waterborne pathogen. However, it has the same morphology as Y. entercolitica and other waterborne Yersinia spp.

                                                         Yersinia pestis

Source: http://www3.niaid.nih.gov/topics/BiodefenseRelated/Biodefense/PublicMedia/image_library.htm
Credit (photo and description): Rocky Mountain Laboratories, NIAID, NIH

References

These pictures are part of the Public Health Image Library (PHIL) from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The photos are in the public domain and thus free of copyright restrictions.

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